Can An Employer Tell Other Employees Why You Were Fired? Yes, But!

Written By Aleena

Can an employer tell other employees why you were fired? Well, the answer is affirmative.

There are certain laws about what an employer can and cannot say about a former employee.

Can An Employer Tell Other Employees Why You Were Fired?

In general, the answer is yes. Employers are free to discuss the circumstances that led to an employee’s departure.

This includes providing information about why they fired the individual.

Exceptions:

There are certain exceptions when the employer can not tell other employee why they fired you, though:

1. If you have an employment contract that prohibits the disclosure of your firing reason.

2. If you are a union member, your employer cannot tell other employees why they fired you fired. It is unless the information is already public knowledge.

3. When you are a whistleblower and your firing relates to your whistleblowing activities

4. If you have filed a lawsuit or claim against your employer.

5. When you are a part of a safety investigation and your firing relates to that investigation.

Can An Employer Tell Other Employees Why You Were Fired

6. If you are under 18 and they fired you for violating a workplace safety rule.

7. If they fired you for refusing to participate in an illegal act.

8. When they fired you for filing a workers’ compensation claim.

Termination With Cause And Without Cause:

It is high time to discuss the two types of firings: with and without cause.

1. With Cause:

An employer can fire an employee “with cause” if the individual has done something wrong. And it warrants termination.

The employer has to prove that the company fired the employee for a legitimate reason.

Under this, employers can discuss the circumstances that led to the employee’s departure.

2. Without Cause:

An employer can fire an employee “without cause” if the individual has not done anything wrong. And the termination is because the company no longer needs the position filled.

In this case, the employer does not have to provide a reason for the firing.

However, the employer cannot discuss the circumstances that led to the employee’s departure.

Employers Have To Be Careful When Disclosing The Information

Employers should be carefully following certain points. Otherwise, it can lead to defamation:

1. Do Not Make False Statements:

Employers must be careful not to make false statements or slander former employees.

When an employer provides information about the termination, it must be truthful.

Moreover, they should not exaggerate or embellish the facts. It can defame the employee and make it hard for them to find new work.

2. Facts Only:

The employer should stick to the facts only. They cannot provide their opinion about why the they terminated the individual.

For example, they can say that they fired the employee for violating a company policy. But they cannot say that the employee is lazy or incompetent.

Likewise, they can say that the individual resigned. But they should not give their opinion about why.

3. No Personal Details:

Employers should also avoid providing any personal details about the former employee.

This includes information like their race, religion, or political views.

Personal details also include information about the employee’s family or private life.

The employer should also keep things confidential. They should not share the information with other employees.

It is important to respect the individual’s privacy.

If an employer discloses any confidential information about a former employee. Then ex-worker may have grounds for a lawsuit.

4. Follow Local Laws:

Employers should check the local laws before discussing a former employee.

The laws about defamation vary from state to state.

Can An Employer Tell Other Employees Why You Were Fired (2)

In some states, employers can provide more information than in other states.

Therefore, employers need to familiarize themselves with the law in their area.

When discussing a former employee, employers should be careful to follow the law.

5. Consider the Circumstances:

When sharing this information with other employees, employers should consider the circumstances.

For example:

They let the individual go for poor performance. Sharing that information with other workers might be appropriate.

But, if they fired them for a non-work-related issue, it might be best to keep that information private. Issue can be such as a criminal conviction,

But if they terminated the person for cause, the employer could tell other employees. Means the person did something wrong,

Employers should use common sense when sharing this information and consider the situation.

6. Keep It Short And To The Point:

Employers should keep it short and to the point when discussing the termination.

They should not go into too much detail about why they fired individual or they quit.

This can be overwhelming for the other employees. And, it might lead to uncomfortable questions.

Employers should provide just the basic facts.

If the individual wants to share more information, they can do so themselves.

Reasons Employer Tells Other Employees Why You Were Fired

There are a few reasons why an employer might want to do this:

1. A Lesson For Employees:

First, they may want to ensure that other employees don’t behave similarly.

It can lead to other employees avoiding such behavior in the future.

For instance:

An employer wants to tell other employees that the individual stole from the company. Thus they fired them.

This can serve as a lesson for them and help them avoid making the same mistake.

2. To Protect The Company:

Second, employers may want to share this information to protect the company.

reasons of firing an individual

For example:

They fired an employee for violating a company policy. The employer might want to share that information with other employees.

For example:

They fired an employee for a non-work-related issue, such as a criminal conviction. It might be best to keep that information private.

3. To Avoid Lawsuits:

Finally, an employer might share this information to avoid lawsuits.

The employer discloses any confidential or private information about a former employee. Here the ex-worker may have grounds for a lawsuit.

By sharing the facts about why they fired the employee, the employer helps avoid legal issues.

4. To Alert Future Employers:

Employers might also want to share this information with future employers.

This can help to ensure that the individual is not hired again.

For example:

An employer wants to tell a future employer that they fired that individual for sexual harassment.

By sharing this information, the employer helps protect other employees from facing behavior.

Defamation Laws

The employer wants to provide more information than the state law allows. They might choose to do so to protect themselves from a potential lawsuit.

When discussing a former employee, employers should be careful to follow the law.

Many different defamation laws vary from state to state.

Employers should know state laws before sharing any information about a former employee.

Types Of Defamation Laws:

Generally, there are two types of defamation laws:

1. Libel:

Libel is the act of publishing a false statement about someone that damages their reputation.

defamation laws

For example:

An employer publishes an article saying they fired a former employee for stealing. That would be libel.

In this case, the employee can sue the employer for damages to their reputation.

They can go to court and follow this procedure:

– The employee must prove that the statement was false.

– They must prove that the statement got issued.

– They must prove that the statement caused them harm.

– The employee can only sue for damages that occurred after the statement got public.

2. Slander:

Slander is the act of making a false statement about someone to someone else.

For example:

If an employer tells a co-worker that they fired the individual for stealing, slander would be.

Slander is a less serious offense than libel. The employee can only sue for damages that occurred after the statement.

If they are unsure, they can always consult an attorney.

Consequences Of Defamation Laws:

If an employer is guilty of libel or slander, they can face several consequences. These can include:

1. Monetary Damages:

The employee can sue the employer for monetary damages.

This includes damages for:

– Lost wages

Emotional distress, and any other damages caused by the statement.

2. Injunction:

The court can also issue an injunction. It is a court order to stop the employer from publishing the statement.

Under this, the court will force employer to remove the statement from any public forums, such as:

– Websites or

– Social media.

3. Punitive Damages:

The court can also award punitive damages to the employee in some cases.

libel

These are damages meant to punish the employer for their actions.

For instance, the court orders the employer to pay the employee’s legal fees.

4. Criminal Charges:

In some cases, the employer could also face criminal charges.

This usually happens if the statement had a malicious intent.

For example:

An employer might get charged with libel. If they published a false statement about an employee. And, the intent is to damage their reputation.

Thus, employers should be aware of the defamation laws in their state.

Conclusion:

An employer can tell other employees why they fired a former employee. But employers should be careful to follow the law.

They should follow certain basic ethics when discussing the reason.

Many different defamation laws vary from state to state. Employers need to research the rules in their state.

Only then must they share any information about a former employee. If they are unsure, they can always consult an attorney.

Last Updated on 3 months by Shahzaib Arshad

Aleena

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